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Oct
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Domenico Remps, Cabinet of Curiosities, 1690s, Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Florence
Domenico Remps (also Rems) was an Italian painter of German or Flemish  origin. He was active in the second half of 17th century in Venice and  was a successful painter of Trompe-l’oeil paintings.
This trompe-l’oeil painting representing a cabinet of curiosities blurs the boundary between real and fictitious space.
Trompe-l’oeil, the French term for “eye-deceiver,” is a modern word for  an old phenomenon: a three-dimensional “perception” provoked by a flat  surface, for a puzzling moment of insecurity and reflection. The early  precursors of modern trompe l’oeil appeared during the Renaissance, with  the discovery of mathematically correct perspective. But the fooling of  the eye to the point of confusion with reality only emerged with the  rise of still-life painting in the Netherlands in the 17th century.  Though highly esteemed by collectors, from the beginning art theorists  often dismissed trompe-l’oeil as the lowest category of art, seeing it  as a mere technical tour-de-force that did not require invention or  intellectual thought. In the 17th century, trompe-l’oeil masters were  not only receiving praise and recognition from many quarters but also  pushing the boundaries of the genre. (Source: Web Gallery of Art)

Domenico Remps, Cabinet of Curiosities, 1690s, Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Florence

Domenico Remps (also Rems) was an Italian painter of German or Flemish origin. He was active in the second half of 17th century in Venice and was a successful painter of Trompe-l’oeil paintings.

This trompe-l’oeil painting representing a cabinet of curiosities blurs the boundary between real and fictitious space.

Trompe-l’oeil, the French term for “eye-deceiver,” is a modern word for an old phenomenon: a three-dimensional “perception” provoked by a flat surface, for a puzzling moment of insecurity and reflection. The early precursors of modern trompe l’oeil appeared during the Renaissance, with the discovery of mathematically correct perspective. But the fooling of the eye to the point of confusion with reality only emerged with the rise of still-life painting in the Netherlands in the 17th century. Though highly esteemed by collectors, from the beginning art theorists often dismissed trompe-l’oeil as the lowest category of art, seeing it as a mere technical tour-de-force that did not require invention or intellectual thought. In the 17th century, trompe-l’oeil masters were not only receiving praise and recognition from many quarters but also pushing the boundaries of the genre. (Source: Web Gallery of Art)