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Sep
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Google and the Myceliation of Consciousness
    

"Is this the largest organism in the world? This 2,400-acre (9.7 km2) site in eastern Oregon had a contiguous growth of mycelium before logging roads cut through it. Estimated at 1,665 football fields in size and 2,200 years old, this one fungus has killed the forest above it several times over, and in so doing has built deeper soil layers that allow the growth of ever-larger stands of trees. Mushroom-forming forest fungi are unique in that their mycelial mats can achieve such massive proportions.”

Paul Stamets, American mycologist, author, Mycelium Running

"What Stamet calls the mycelial archetype [Mycelial nets are designed the same as brain cells: centers with branches reaching out, whole worlds. 96% of dark matter threads]. He compares the mushroom mycelium with the overlapping information-sharing systems that comprise the Internet, with the networked neurons in the brain, and with a computer model of dark matter in the universe. All share this densely intertwingled filamental structure. Stamets says in Mycelium Running,

“I believe that the mycelium operates at a level of complexity that exceeds the computational powers of our most advanced supercomputers. I see the mycelium as the Earth’s natural Internet, a consciousness with which we might be able to communicate.” (…)

This super-connectivity and conductivity is often accompanied by blissful mindbody states and the cognitive ecstasy of multiple “aha’s!” when the patterns in the mycelium are revealed. The Googling that has become a prime noetic technology (How can we recognize a pattern and connect more and more, faster and faster?: superconnectivity and superconductivity) mirrors the increased speed of connection of thought-forms from cannabis highs on up. The whole process is driven by desire not only for these blissful states in and of themselves, but also as the cognitive resource they represent. (…) The devices of desire are those that connect. The Crackberry is just the latest super-connectivity and conductivity device-of-desire.

The psilocybin mushroom embeds the form of its own life-cycle into consciousness when consciousness is altered by the mushroom, and this template, brought home to Google Earth, made into tools of connectivity, potentiates the mycelium of knowledge, connecting all cultural production. The traditional repositories—the books and print and CD and DVD materials—swarm online, along with intimate glimpses of Everyblogger’s Life in multimediated detail.

Here on Google watch, I’m tracking the form of this whole wildly interconnecting activity that this desire to connect inscribes, the millions of simultaneous individual expressions of desire: searches, adclicks, where am I?, what’s near me?, who’s connected to whom? The desire extends the filaments, and energizes the constant linking and unlinking of the vast signaling system that lights up the mycelium. Periodic visits to the psychedelic sphere reveal the progress of this mycelial growth, as well as its back-history, future, origins, inhabitants, and purpose. Google is growing the cultural mycelial mat, advancing this process exponentially. Google is the first psychedelically informed super-power to shape the noosphere and NASDAQ. Google is part of virtually everybody’s online day. The implications are staggering. (…)

In the domain of consciousness, super-connectivity and super-conductivity also reign. Superconductivity: speed is of the essence. Speed of conductivity of meaning. How fast can consciousness make meaning out of the flux of perceptions? (…)

When Google breaks through the natural language barrier and catches a glimpse, at least, of what it’s like to operate cognition entirely outside the veil of natural language, they will truly be Masters of Meaning. (…) Meaning manifests independently of language, though often finds itself entombed therein. But from this bootstrap move outside language, new insights arise regarding the structures and functions of natural language from a perspective that handles cognition with different tools, perceptions, sensory modalities—and produces new forms of language with new feature sets. (…)

This is the download Terence McKenna kept cycling through, and represents the key noetic technology for the stabilization of the transformation of consciousness in a sharable conceptual architecture. In Terence’s words,

It’s almost as though the project of communication becomes high-speed sculpture in a conceptual dimension made of light and intentionality. This would remain a kind of esoteric performance on the part of shamans at the height of intoxication if it were not for the fact that electronics and electronic cultural media, computers, make it possible for us to actually create records of these higher linguistic modalities.”

RoseRose, “paleoanthropologist from a distant timeframe”, in deep cover on Google Earth as a video performance artist, Google and the Myceliation of Consciousness, Reality Sandwich, Nov 10, 2007 (Illustration source)

See also:

☞ Paul Stamets, Six Ways Mushrooms Can Save the World, TED.com, 2008 (video)