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May
20th
Sun
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ChronoZoom ☞ The history of life, the universe and everything - visualised


                                                                 Click image to explore

"Imagine a timeline of the universe, complete with high-resolution videos and images, in which you could zoom from a chronology of Egypt’s dynasties and pyramids to the tale of a Japanese-American couple interned in a World War II relocation camp to a discussion of a mass extinction that occurred on Earth 200 million years ago – all in seconds. (…)

A University of California, Berkeley, geologist and his students have teamed up with Microsoft Research Connections engineers to make this web-based software possible. (…)

The idea arose in a UC Berkeley course about Big History taught by Walter Alvarez, the campus geologist who first proposed that a comet or asteroid smashed into the Earth 65 million years ago and killed off the dinosaurs. Big History is a unified, interdisciplinary way of looking at and teaching the history of the cosmos, Earth, life and humanity: the history of everything.

One of the difficulties of teaching history –- and teaching Big History, in particular –- is conveying a sense of the time scale, which ranges from the 50,000-year time span of modern humans to the 13.7 billion-year history of the universe, Alvarez said. Human history compared to cosmic history is like “a postage stamp relative to the whole size of the United States.”

“With ChronoZoom, you are browsing history, not digging it out piece by piece,” said Alvarez, a Professor of the Graduate School in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science. (…)

ChronoZoom is a visualization tool allowing for the first time people to mash up data from all sorts of different places in different formats enabling new insights that would never have been possible before.”

ChronoZoom: A deep dive into the history of everything

See also:

David Christian: Big History Project | TED

'Backed by stunning illustrations, David Christian narrates a complete history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the Internet, in a riveting 18 minutes. This is “Big History”: an enlightening, wide-angle look at complexity, life and humanity, set against our slim share of the cosmic timeline.”

David Christian, David Christian: Big history, TED, March 2011.

Timeline tag on Lapidarium notes

Nov
23rd
Wed
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The maps of the Internet

                                                          Click image to enlarge

The Opte Project was created to make a visual representation of a space that is very much one-dimensional, a metaphysical universe. The data represented and collected here serves a multitude of purposes: Modeling the Internet, analyzing wasted IP space, IP space distribution, detecting the result of natural disasters, weather, war, and esthetics/art.

"Within two weeks the self-described technologist and entrepreneur Barrett Lyon had created a program that could output a detailed visualization of Internet connectivity in a few hours. Seven years and billions more Internet-connected devices later, Lyon is still at it. This cosmic-looking image, one of his newest creations, traces the millions of routes along which data can travel and pinpoints the hubs receiving the most traffic. Internet giants such as AT&T and Google manage the most heavily used networks, which appear here as glowing yellow orbs; they tend to concentrate in the center of the sphere. The less popular local networks (red) sit on the periphery. Although Lyon’s visualizations have appeared in computing textbooks and at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.”

The Internet Looks Like a Fractal Dandelion, DISCOVER Magazine, Nov 11, 2011

                                                         Click image to enlarge

"This map is built off of our database using two different graphing engines: Large Graph Layout (LGL) by Alex Adai and Graphviz by Peter North at AT&T Labs Research.

This graph is by far our most complex. It is using over 5 million edges and has an estimated 50 million hop count.
Graph Colors:
Asia Pacific - Red
Europe/Middle East/Central Asia/Africa - Green
North America - Blue
Latin American and Caribbean - Yellow
RFC1918 IP Addresses - Cyan
Unknown - White
Date: Nov 22 2003

Today the image has been used free of charge across the globe and is part of the permanent collection at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Boston Museum of Science. It has been used in countless books, media, and even movies.”

The Opte Project

Internet Mapping Project

                                                              Click image to enlarge

Image colored by IP address in 16 August 1998. More: The Internet Mapping Project.

See also:

The Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis
Cyber Geography Research
The Rocketfuel ISP topology mapping engine

Aug
5th
Fri
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A Record Of Life

A beautiful short animation made by Owen Gatley and Luke Jinks loosely based on the scientific recording of lifes great species and how this has given us clues that piece together, for us to discover the secrets of the evolution and diversity of life on Earth.

Apr
28th
Thu
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Science and art come together in the Undivided Mind | Imaginary Foundation


                                                      (Click image to see 3D visualization)

The Undivided Mind installation is a project of The Imaginary Foundation.

"This installation endeavors to fuse the aesthetic beauty of art and science in order to create a synthesis of mind, one which is as much rational as it is fantastic. Think of this undivided mind as a prototype of human possibility-an evolutionary signal of convergence, harmony, and accelerated progress. The rest is up to us."

This is a virtual simulacrum of the installation that materialized in San Francisco in November of 2010.

The Imaginary Foundation is a think tank from Switzerland that does experimental research on new ways of thinking and the power of the imagination. Avoiding direct publicity, the team has sought clothing as an unlikely vehicle for bringing their ideas beyond the academic realm and into popular culture.

A philosophy of research began to form: imagination as fundamental to all learning; artistic making as a model of integrating vision, materials, structure, and imagery.

The Undivided Mind

The Pattern That Connects


                                                         (Click image to enlarge)

(tnx Jason Silva)

Man creates reality


                                                         (Click image to enlarge)

The Imaginary Foundation

Apr
8th
Fri
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Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky

     
                                              (Click image to see interactive 3D model)

"Solar System Scope space traveller will illustrate you real-time celestial positions with planets and constellations moving over the night sky. You can actively change parameters for a better understanding of happenings in our Solar System and the Universe."

See also:
Hubble Telescope Site
HobbySpace - Webguide to space hobbies and activies
Nine Planets - A Multimedia Tour of the Solar System: one star, eight planets, and more
LSST - Large Synoptic Survey Telescope - the widest, fastest, deepest eye of the new digital age

Apr
6th
Wed
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Conflict History ☞ browse the timeline of war and conflicts across the globe (interactive map)


                                         (Click image to see timeline)

Jun
9th
Wed
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Relationships among Scientific Paradigms (infographic)
This map (click image twice to blow up size) was constructed by sorting roughly 800,000 published papers into 776 different scientific paradigms (shown as pale circular nodes) based on how often the papers were cited together by authors of other papers.
Links (curved black lines) were made between the paradigms that shared papers, then treated as rubber bands: holding similar paradigms nearer on another when a physical simulation forces every paradigm to repel every other; thus the layout derives directly from the data.
Larger paradigms have more papers; node proximity and darker links indicate how many papers are shared between two paradigms. Flowing labels list common words unique to each paradigm, large labels general areas of scientific inquiry. (This work was initially commissioned by Katy Borner (Associate Professor of Information Science, Indiana University) for the travelling exhibition Places & Spaces: Cartography of the Physical and the Abstract. Research and node layout by Kevin Boyack (Principal Member of Technical Staff, Sandia National Laboratories) and Dick Klavans (President, SciTech Strategies, Inc.); data from Thomson ISI; graphics & typography by W. Bradford Paley (Adjunct Associate Professor, Columbia University; Director, Information Esthetics). This print is a variation of that printed in Nature, volume 444 issue number 7122, page 985 in the feature 2006 Gallery; Brilliant Display. The data is from 2003 and the information visualization and type layout techniques are from early 2006; work progresses on all fronts.)

Relationships among Scientific Paradigms (infographic)

This map (click image twice to blow up size) was constructed by sorting roughly 800,000 published papers into 776 different scientific paradigms (shown as pale circular nodes) based on how often the papers were cited together by authors of other papers.

Links (curved black lines) were made between the paradigms that shared papers, then treated as rubber bands: holding similar paradigms nearer on another when a physical simulation forces every paradigm to repel every other; thus the layout derives directly from the data.

Larger paradigms have more papers; node proximity and darker links indicate how many papers are shared between two paradigms. Flowing labels list common words unique to each paradigm, large labels general areas of scientific inquiry.

(This work was initially commissioned by Katy Borner (Associate Professor of Information Science, Indiana University) for the travelling exhibition Places & Spaces: Cartography of the Physical and the Abstract. Research and node layout by Kevin Boyack (Principal Member of Technical Staff, Sandia National Laboratories) and Dick Klavans (President, SciTech Strategies, Inc.); data from Thomson ISI; graphics & typography by W. Bradford Paley (Adjunct Associate Professor, Columbia University; Director, Information Esthetics). This print is a variation of that printed in Nature, volume 444 issue number 7122, page 985 in the feature 2006 Gallery; Brilliant Display. The data is from 2003 and the information visualization and type layout techniques are from early 2006; work progresses on all fronts.)

May
13th
Thu
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A Drifting Up by Reza Ali

This is an audio-reactive algorithmic visual art piece that uses the concept of charged particles and flocking to simulate a organism that is alive and composed of micro-organisms. - Source, (audio: Jon Hopkins - “A Drifting Up”)

Mar
16th
Tue
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(via birdlab)

Mar
13th
Sat
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New City - Surreal Virtual World - What if you could design another world? How would it look? What would you call it? | L STUDIO

Greg Lynn explains the concept behind New City, a new virtual world.

Mar
12th
Fri
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JoAnn Kuchera-Morin from the Center for Research in Electronic Art Technology (CREATE) at UC Santa Barbara demos the AlloSphere, a stunning new way to see, hear and interpret scientific data. Dive into the brain, feel electron spin, hear the music of the elements … and detect previously unseen patterns that could lead to new discoveries.

The AlloSphere, a 30-foot diameter sphere built inside a 3-story near-to-anechoic (echo free) cube, allows for synthesis, manipulation, exploration and analysis of large-scale data sets in an environment that can simulate virtually real sensorial perception. It is a physical place designed to facilitate creativity and incubate ideas via collaboration. Researchers find a multitude of interactive interfaces for research into: scientific visualization, numerical simulations, data mining, visual/aural abstract data representations, knowledge discovery, systems integration, human perception, and many other areas of inquiry.” — The AlloSphere at the California NanoSystems Institute

More video: Allosphere by Jason Silva

A three story metal sphere in an echo-free chamber, it is the culmination of 24 years of Professor Joann Kuchera-Morin’s creativity and research.

"Insights abound, awareness rebounds, and shackles are being untangled, we might, if all goes well, be free. Free of our genetics heritage and free of our biological roots, free to soar into a promisingly magnificent future, the future of commingled information, of interweaved sensation, of co-opted dreams." WildCat, SpaceCollective.org

"An instrument similar to the telescope, it will enable scientists to see data in new ways that provoke insight. It is also like a violin or a symphony orchestra - an instrument to compose for and to play."

More info: The AlloSphere at the California NanoSystems Institute, UC Santa Barbara

Mar
6th
Sat
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Science related Wikipedian activity
This visualization explores the activity of science, math, and technology (SMT) related articles in the English language Wikipedia.
Blue, green, and yellow circles represent the 3,599 math, 6,474 science, and 3,164 technology related articles respectively. The larger the size of a circle the higher the likelihood it is that type of article. Exactly 8,181 articles are in one category, 2,348 in two, and 73 in three categories leading to interesting color mixtures. The four corners show smaller versions of the map with articles size coded according to article edit activity (top left), number of major edits from January 1st, 2007 to April 6th, 2007 (top right), number of bursts in edit activity (bottom right) and indegree, e.g., the number of times other articles link to an article (bottom left). These visualizations serve to highlight current trends and predict future editing activity and growth in science, technology, and mathematics related Wikipedia articles — Source: Science Related Wikipedian Activity

Science related Wikipedian activity

This visualization explores the activity of science, math, and technology (SMT) related articles in the English language Wikipedia.

Blue, green, and yellow circles represent the 3,599 math, 6,474 science, and 3,164 technology related articles respectively. The larger the size of a circle the higher the likelihood it is that type of article. Exactly 8,181 articles are in one category, 2,348 in two, and 73 in three categories leading to interesting color mixtures. The four corners show smaller versions of the map with articles size coded according to article edit activity (top left), number of major edits from January 1st, 2007 to April 6th, 2007 (top right), number of bursts in edit activity (bottom right) and indegree, e.g., the number of times other articles link to an article (bottom left). These visualizations serve to highlight current trends and predict future editing activity and growth in science, technology, and mathematics related Wikipedia articles — Source: Science Related Wikipedian Activity